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20100901
20100930
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
you on a friday, bye bye jenna: hi everybody, thank you for joining us, i'm jenna lee, rick: i'm rick folbaum. "happening now", in' top box, chilling new video from the fbi of the destructive power of the foiled times square bomb attempt and brand new information about a second planned attack. jenna: in the middle box, new details about another terror plot overseas, the shocking revelations about the men allegedly targeting germany, france and the u.k., what this means for our national safety. rick: in the bottom box, a tea party coloring book for kids, now reportedly prompting death threats for the publisher. he joins us live, coming up this hour. yuen jen but we begin with a fox news weather alert, the east coast, socked with a major storm today, now sweating even tornadoes, a very big concern. look at what people in north carolina are dealing with today, nearly two -- 21 inches of rain in wilmington. one woman says she's never seen anything like it: >> i used to live in houston, and i thought i'd seen a lot of rain there, but this is incredible. i've never seen flooding like this.
in the investigation and recovery efforts are with us in the audience today. for the first responders, around -- a round of applause. [applause] this is also the place where the media gave the nation and the world their first glimpse of the crash site. this is the place where a community in nation came together, the red cross and salvation army and good samaritans demonstrated great compassion and care here. local residents of this community and county opened their home andeart to the families and to the nation. a small memorial of pay bills was placed at the overlook where families could leave -- of hay bales was placed at the overlook where families could leave flowers and other items. still adding we're to that simple memorial. the nation in the world have joined the salute. you will hear from distinguished speakers today. i want to impart with you the confidence that the department of the interior, in our capacity as to words of national parks and historic sites for our great nation, is committed to building this memorl. because of the work here, we're on our way, with the friends and fam
cleared, the loss was actually greater. all of us can remember where we were, what we were doing, and how we felt as the news of the attacks was broadcast over all of the news networks. most of us had the opportunity to experience those attacks through our televisions, most in the privacy of our own homes, where we were able to take in and process, and grieve over what was occurring. the people that we will be talking with today did not have that luxury of learning about the events on their televisions. these were the individuals that were on the front lines that day. they were the men and women who could not watch it on tv, but had to respond. they had to act. they had no time to grieve. they had no time to plan. they had no time to prepare. we had not prepared for what happened that day. they were called upon to improvise. their actions and their decisions could either cost lives or save lives. for me, as an airline pilot, the was not flying that day, i had a burning desire to understand what it was like for these people that were in the air traffic control facility, and the cockpit, an
. we had to fly over that. we had to make our own rules. it was pretty incredible. the decision for us in the washington area to get everyone down on the ground was a quick one. my supervisor made the decision on his own. it was a great decisn. that part of our job was done. the big part was setting up a fighter cap and identifying all of the other aircraft and things coming and going in the air space. was really an incredible few hours. >> you mentioned a couple of years back in the circumstance stuck with me. during this time as you have all the fighters over the city, you are breaking all of theules. you had created your own rules on howou operate this day. there was an aircraft coming into d.c. -- obviously a government aircraf you have determined how you were going to thread it through all the fighters circling the city. your supervisor walked into the room. >> when the attorney general is coming in, that is a different story. we will get to that if we have time. we did not know who it was. andrews aiforce base was recovering military leaders to go in there and do what they had to
. a man by the name of kashmiri. security teams are telling us that the threat is on going and american tourists oversees are potential targets. the ideal would be to hit several targets to multiply the impact. >> the potential for three countries, france, germany and britain to be attacked simultaneously is actually a global-shock attack, and it comes out of the maturity in the style of attacks that pakistan has very sadly been having for a longtime, and also that the colders are seeing in afghanistan. megyn: steve centanni is tracking all of this and the threat assessment live for us at the pentagon. steve, what are you learning? >> reporter: u.s. officials are telling us, that they had a specific -- credible information but not specific information about a terror attack that would have been focused in europe in several countries in europe. it's unclear exactly what was being planned. the plot apparently has been disrupted for the most part but the danger could continue. one scenario had terrorists swarming over tourist hotels, ala mumbai, that's exactly what happened in mumbai, india
speaking i would appreciate it. tell us your name and any ebullitions you might have. please wait. we have microphones coming around to you. >> thank you. i am mike billington. i do not know if you went to the conference in quantico last week, but at that conference are raise the exact question you have drawn, the elite of the chinese and russians and others that the evidence is an adequate. the response from different generals as we do not need no stinking evidence. [laughter] look at the provocations, it isn't their character, therefore we have to accept this is true. you did not mention the issue, which has concerned me about this, which is why in this area of very high south korean and u.s. and nato anti-submarine warfare facilities and sonar equipment and so forth there appears to have been no son are evidence whatsoever -- no sonar evidence whatsoever? we all know that north korea said they had nothing to do with this, but i am wondering what you did north korea thinks about this. in other words, who could have done it, who in the west? is that the british? whaty is the view of the n
of those attacks failed. but from al qaeda's perspective, they were successful. they tied up the u.s. security services, they cost a great deal of money. and al qaeda decided we got a lot of bang for a failed attack. let's keep them going. that's what has people concerned. >> we keep calling the new normal, keeps changing all the time. richard engel, thanks as always. >>> now to what was a breaking domestic story late today. a terrible bus crash in maryland. at least one person was killed when a charter bus carrying children and their parents fell 45 feet off a sky ramp on the d.c. beltway. it landed along a stretch of interstate 270, backed up traffic 15 miles and we're told that won't be cleared for hours. state police say rescue crews had to cut free four people who were trapped inside the bus. some of the survivors we're told tonight have sadly life-threatening injuries. >>> much of the east coast is under a serious flood watch tonight, and take a look at why. it's a weather system that stretches between two major cities very far apart. miami, all the way north to new york, as if
in one million foreigners a year into our country legally. nobody can match us. nobody can come close in the entire world. the united states opens our doors to a million people to follow the rules and come into this country. yes, you can call it compassion, but it is random compassion. who said these people, determined by the white house, are more deserving of compassion than these people over here because we've got, according to most of the estimates, between 12 million and 20 million of these people in our country. so, why -- who decides and who picks those 17,000? and are we starting a policy that everybody that's awaiting a hearing in a immigration court will just be excused? is that the new policy? so 17,000 is just a start? i don't know, we don't have an answer to that. but the real question we have to be concerned about is, who made the executive branch so independent to operate that they can shut down things like drilling in the gulf and turn loose people who have pending court cases on their say-so? without any consultation or action by the legislative branch of the governmen
nuclear arms reduction treaty. >> with the house and senate back in session, follow congress using the c-span 2 libraries -- using the c-span video library. it is a great resource for anyone who uses the library. >> the imam leading the effort to build a summit center near ground zero says he is surprised by the controversy surrounding the plan. from the scalp -- from the council on foreign plans in new york city, this is one hour. >> good morning. people, please take your seats. welcome to the council on foreign relations. my name is richard hoss and i am the president of this organization. today, as you all know, we are hosting feisal abdul rauf, who is the founder and ceo for the american society for muslim advancement. he is also the imam, which i expect you all know, for the mosque here in new york city. that is, however, only part of who we is. he is the founder and chair of the cordova initiative dedicated to building bridges between the muslim and non-muslim world. he is also essential to plans for the building to the new islamic community center to be built adjacent to ground ze
recognition in alaska. she served as state congresswoman for a few years. her father was a u.s. senator later went on to become the governor of alaska. she was appointed to his senate seat in '02. then reelected by the people in '04. murkowski says she has been hearing a lot from her constituents. people who are not pleased about the primary results that's one of the reasons for her decision as well. >> when those votes came in on the 24th of august, when they were counted, there was nobody that was more disappointed than i was. but since then, things have happened, events have transpired. there has been an outpouring of support from alaskans all over the state. >> reporter: regardless of what happens, it is going to be an uphill battle for her, for sure. the only person in history to get elected to senate as a write-in candidate was strom thurmond that was back in 1954, way before this tea party we are seeing here in america. >> you mentioned uphill battle to say the lost. many in her own party, the republican party are upset over this. >> reporter: absolutely. a lot of feathers have been ru
's how it works. technicians use a gel patch to get a good connection on the fat. >> no pain or anything like that. it's like putting a clothes pin on your side. >> reporter: it freezes the fat cells, causing them to self-destruct and be reabsorbed into the oddy. another mkt, zarona, is a low-powered laser that is aimed at trouble spots, causing the fat cells to collapse in a matter of weeks. >> this is a big deal. it's the first time the fda has cleared a non-invasive fat reduction technology. >> reporter: former dancer lisa petaniak spent $1500 to have some of her excess fat frozen. >> at first it was a strange pulling feeling and a little painful, and after about five or ten minutes you basically get numb. >> reporter: she said she's happy with the results, losing about half an inch off her abdomen. zeltique was initially approved by the fda to anesthetize and cool the skin before dermatology procedures. despite its newly approved use, doctors say overweight patients shouldn't expect too much. >> it's not going to make someone who's obese not obese. the idea is there are certain areas
not less. but let's use this as a learning opportunity, don't shut them down, let them speak, but what is the message and who is involved, not speculation, not future news, from them, who is involved and who are they proud to stand next to. find out, maybe more than you want to know, next. hello america. i-- i'm glad you're here tonight. i want to have a conversation with you, but i want to have a reasoned conversation because quite honestly, i feel stupid when i say communist, a few years ago, i didn't think that-- i wouldn't have believed half of this stuff. i don't want to believe it now. during the election 2008 some people were questioning whether or not barack obama were a socialist. there were some strong evidence, his past association and his own words. >> i think that there was a tendency to lose track of the political and community organizing and activities on the ground that are able to put together the actual coalitions of power through which you bring about redistributed change. everybody's so tense that business is bad for everybody. i think when you spread the wealth aro
in the u.s. but is still expected to make 30 million bucks in this country alone. >> you have to also wonder there has been a ban in europe. they've already halted, you know, in terms of giving it to patients. you have to wonder if that affected some of the revenue because in europe they're saying it's not a good idea. >>> >>> ford has unveiled its newest air bag that is designed to reduce injuries caused by their deployment. the air bags are located in the steering wheel. they promise to reduce injuries like broken ribs. they're designed to pull away from the driver's chest while protecting both the head and the neck. the air bag will be featured in the new ford focus, which goes on sale early next week. >>> while saving many lives in accidents, of course air bags have had a long history of causing injuries. >> one concern in the past was the connection between air bags and children. for more now we go into the abc news vault from september the 6th, 1996. >> reporter: they are comforting images of safety in action. in slow motion pictures of crash tests the air bags appear to gently
. this is a huge clue that could tell us what caused america's worst environmental disaster. here's matt gutman. >> reporter: like some mangled creature raised from the deep this million-pound mass of steel could tell the story of what went wrong on april 20th and who is to blame for the worst spill in u.s. history and the deaths of 11 men. >> bringing this to a conclusion for the investigation to move forward for the families is a major, major thing for the memories of them 11 men. >> reporter: the busted blow-out preventer or b.o.p., is such a key piece of evidence that the fbi documented every step of its slow rise to the surface and agents will remain with it even as it's hauled to an ultra security nasa installation. forensic teams from a half dozen agencies will scrutinize every inch of it. >> what they'll be looking for is why the sort of last-ditch measure didn't work. >> reporter: five stories high, the b.o.p. was a series of valves and ramps designed to slam shut in the event of a leak, the last line of defense. but as we learned at the the blow-out prevention center this was not one
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)